Oracle, Google Struggle To Explain APIs To Jury

Oracle, Google Struggle To Explain APIs To Jury (www.informationweek.com)

Oracle and Google continued their legal battle in San Francisco federal court on Thursday, beginning the day with a tussle over the authenticity of Java code that Oracle claims to have downloaded from Google’s website on March 12. Oracle says the file shows that Google has not removed the allegedly infringing Android code from its public website as Google claims to have done. Google wants some assurance that the file really was downloaded then. (Continue reading at www.informationweek.com)

My Two Cents: Let me sum this up as a software developer. Shame on you Google, you will lose this case big time to Oracle, you cannot use someone elses property then resale it, or give it away. Its not yours to do so. You must develop the software yourself, or purchase a license. This includes any APIs, which is software code that is owned by Oracle. This is a pretty closed case here. Once proof is provided by Oracle and Google cannot dispute that the Java code is not theirs, then Google is liable for this. I feel as a software developer, people should go to jail over this. Its so easy to use other people’s code who we spend countless hours developing outside the box, when it doesn’t exist. Very sad to see that this happened. I am sure Justice will be served here.

Voice technology: A real conversation-starter

Voice technology: A real conversation-starter (www.startribune.com)

Voice recognition software works by sending speech to processors that break down spoken words into sound waves and use algorithms to identify the most likely words formed by the sounds. The system typically records and stores speech so it can teach itself to become more accurate over time. (Continue reading at www.startribune.com)

My Two Cents: Voice recognition software has been around for a very long time, especially with IVR systems. What I find exciting today is how accurate the new systems are, and where these systems are turning up. I find the Apple Siri system very useful when sending text. I also find foreign language translation very useful too. We are now leveraging this technology with our inspection and workflow systems in the field, which as been a huge success.